Intersecting Imaginaries
       
     
   
  
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      Linda Cunningham      Surviving Then and Now: South Bronx Sagas,    2015    Found construction elements, collage, dry wall, canvas, photo transfers, pastel, acrylic, mixed media    A commissioned work for NLE Lab                                                            For 15 years, Linda Cunningham has been documenting the changing urban landscape of the Bronx, most recently through shredded drywall sculptures that reckon with memory, loss, and survival. Her sculptures record how nature permeates built environments, focusing on spaces where moisture invades architecture. Now, at a particularly contentious moment in the Bronx, her work finds new prescience and poignancy, engaging with transience and local history while questioning what remains and what is destroyed. 
       
     
NLE_Lab15Fa_view_exhibition_TPI_010.jpg
       
     
   
  
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      Arthur Avilés and Nicolás Dumit Estévez      A Gentle Act of Men in Hunts Point,    2015    Part of  Performing the Bronx     Video    Duration: 22 minutes    Courtesy of the artists     In  Performing the Bronx , Arthur Avilés and Nicolás Dumit Estévez engage in an improvisational public action along Hunts Point Avenue focused on role-modeling kindness between men. Emphasizing banal actions, such as walking in the streets, Avilés and Estévez blur the boundary between everyday life and the performative act. The pair, using movement to promote gentleness, wears vestments designed by Lorenzo Walker and inspired by the clothing worn by Sufi Whirling Dervishes.    This project is made possible with public funds from the Bronx Council on the Arts through the Department of Cultural Affairs’ Greater New York Arts Development Fund Program.  Performing the Bronx  has also received support from Casita Maria and the Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance (BAAD!) and Mothers on the Move (MOM).           David Shrobe      Tight Rope   , 2015    Oil, ink, metal, wood, tile, paper, mixed media    Courtesy of the artist    In his mixed media wall installation    Tight Rope   , David Shrobe maps his environment via found materials collected in his Harlem neighborhood. Using tiles, moldings, and consumer packaging, Shrobe reclaims and re-presents these consumed and discarded items, creating a type of field guide by which to navigate the community. The detritus of the everyday is manipulated, transcending its original purpose and transforming into a remixed assemblage that at once examines the present and imagines the future.        
  
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      Laura Napier      project for a street corner (Yankees),    2011     Video     Duration: 29 seconds    Courtesy of the artist    Working with the Bronx Museum Teen Council, Laura Napier’s  project for a street corner (Yankees)  documents a physical and symbolic confrontation between participating teens and baseball fans immediately before a game at an intersection near Yankee Stadium. Responding to the animosity that some locals feel regarding the infiltration of tourists during baseball season, the performative action both reclaims the streets of the neighborhood and suggests the preservation of locality.
       
     
   
  
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      Josué Guarionex       Coffee Break   , 2014     From the series  The Pursuit of Power     Wooden gun and bullets, coffee machine    Courtesy of the artist    Josué   Guarionex’s  Coffee Break    maps the transatlantic slave trade, in which slaves, crops, and manufactured goods were trafficked between European colonies, West Africa, and the Caribbean. Considering the history of Caribbean coffee and sugar, the work reveals our silent complicity in the cyclical violence. Guarionex repurposes a coffee maker, a symbol of morning ritual and conversation, and literally ruptures that symbol, crystallizing our quotidian connections to systems of oppression.
       
     
   
  
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      Bronx Photo League       Jerome Avenue Workers Project   , 2015    Courtesy of The Bronx Photo League    The Bronx Photo League’s extensive documentary series,  Jerome Avenue Workers Project , sheds light on the people and professions that are threatened by the city’s plans to rezone two miles of Jerome Avenue for residential development. These nuanced portraits archive lived experiences under the strain of geopolitics and capture the ethos of one of New York’s last working class neighborhoods. Depicting workers’ individual relationships to the district, the images reveal the specter of displacement through a personal lens.       Jerome Avenue Workers Project    de parte del Bronx Photo League es una extensa serie documental que recalca las personas y las profesiones amenazadas a causa de los planes gubernativos para recalificar dos millas de la avenida Jerome para desarrollo residencial. Estos retratos son un archivo sútil de las experiencias vividas bajo la presión geopolítica, y capturan al espíritu de uno de los últimos barrios de clase trabajadora de Nueva York. Representando las relaciones individuales de trabajadores y el distrito, las imágenes revelan un espectro del aburguesamiento a través de una lente personal.          Michael Kamber     Oswaldo     1689 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY        Oswaldo stands in traffic on Jerome Avenue waving potential customers into a friend's auto glass shop. Men like Oswaldo are a key part of Jerome Avenue's economy.           Edwin Torres     Bella Santiago Rodriquez     Flat Fix Shop, 1245 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY     Bella Santiago Rodriquez, a 21-year-old native Brazilian, hangs around the Flat Fix Shop on     1245 Jerome Avenue, where she's made a new group of friends that she calls family. She came from Brazil five months ago because of family issues. She hopes to find work at one of the flat fix shops along Jerome Avenue.           Trevon Blondet     Royal “KingBee”     Jerome Ave and Buchannan Ave, Bronx NY     Royal "KingBee," a graffiti artist raised in the Bronx, takes a break from painting a large-scale mural near Jerome Avenue and Buchannan Avenue. He's been a graffiti artist since 1988 and has painted dozens of storefronts along Jerome Avenue.           Osaretin Ugiagbe     Girl at Islamic Cultural Center     1245 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY     A girl stands in front of the Bronx Islamic Cultural Center (Masjid Annasr) located at 50 Tremont Avenue. The center's Imam, Sheikh Ibrahim Gonja, expresses his fear of being pushed out of the neighborhood. The center has long played an important role in the community.            Netza Moreno     Pastor Nicanor González     Church of Living God, 1921 Walton Ave, Bronx NY     Nicanor González, 60, has been the pastor for 36 years at the Church of Living God, located at 1921 Walton Avenue, Bronx.          Melissa Bunni Elian      Bellissima Beauty     2175     Jerome Ave, Bronx NY     An unnamed client takes a cigarette break at Bellissima Beauty Studio at 2175 Jerome Avenue.          Elias Williams      Rubén and Roberto Vasquez      Vasquez Muffler Shop, 1275 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY     Brothers Rubén and Roberto Vasquez and their father, Pilar Antonio Vasquez, the owners of Vasquez Muffler located on 1275 Jerome Avenue. In operation since 1993, they pride themselves on offering auto and muffler repairs at affordable prices.            
  
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      Adi Talwar      Rebecca      God is Wonderful Hair Weave & Braiding Center, 2 W. 183 St, Bronx NY     Rebecca, originally from Ghana, works part-time at the GOD IS WONDERFUL Hair Weave & Braiding Center at Jerome and 183rd Street, which her sister Beatrice has owned for over ten years. Rebecca has been married for two years; she and her husband are both studying health care and she aspires to be a doctor.          Jesus Emmanuel      Mwanz     SE Corner of Burnside and Jerome Ave, Bronx NY     Mwanz, a street vendor who sells incense, accessories, and other holistic materials near the intersection of Burnside Avenue and Jerome Avenue.          Jonathan Santiago      Makilsi Rodriguez      Valencia Bakery, 1997 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY     Makilsi Rodriguez at the Valencia Bakery located on 1997 Jerome Avenue. She has been working as a sales clerk and decorator for over ten years.         Berthland Tekyi-Berto      Tony Ramos     Kerry Carte Barber Shop, 1476 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY     Tony Ramos gives one of his customers a haircut in Kerry Carte barber shop located at 1476 Jerome Avenue. Tony grew up in the neighborhood and has been working at the shop for the past 3 years.         Rhynna Santos     Miriam Maddi     1326 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY     Miriam Maddi has been an employee at the Botanica San Elias, located on 1326 Jerome Avenue, for the past five years. Born in the Dominican Republic, she came to the United States with her family eight years ago. Ms. Maddi dreams of one day owning her own health spa.         David "Dee" Delgado      Raymond Herskovits     Mel's Locksmiths, 4 E 170 St, Bronx NY     Raymond Herskovits inside his tiny storefront, Mel's Locksmiths, at 4 East 170th Street. Raymond is a third generation locksmith; his grandfather first opened the shop in 1932. Raymond no longer resides in the Bronx but commutes six days a week from his home in New Jersey to open his shop.         Heriberto Sanchez     Maria, Alexandro and Allen      Yadira Flower Shop, 6B E 183 St, Bronx NY     Maria and Miguel have been married for ten years; they have two children, Alexandro and Allen. Originally from Oaxaca, Mexico, Maria started selling flowers at a storefront. As her flower business grew she saved enough to open her own small flower shop six months ago.         Ed Alvarez     Marcos Rueda      American Flat Fix & Tire, 1331 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY    Marcos Rueda (left) and his co-worker Vladimir (right) wait for customers to arrive in front of American Flat Fix & Tire located at 1331 Jerome Avenue. Marcos has been working as a flat fix mechanic for the past two-and-a-half years at this shop and a previous eight years in another flat fix on Jerome Avenue.    
       
     
   
  
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      Giacomo Francia      Jerome Avenue Workers,    2015    Video    Duration: 25 minutes    Courtesy of The Bronx Photo League
       
     
NLE_Lab15Fa_view_exhibition_TPI_002.jpg
       
     
   
  
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      Manuela Viera-Gallo      Morir Matando   , 2013    Part of the series  Domestic Violence     Cotton rope, broken ceramic plates, glasses    Courtesy of the artist    Manuela Viera-Gallo’s tightly bound and precariously hanging broken dishes are at once bodily and ghostly, evoking the troubling and pervasive reality of domestic violence. The fragments of porcelain and ceramic—once sophisticated home décor—are transformed into weapons charting the global and local existence of women’s oppression and abuse. Thick cotton ropes and tightly executed knots compound the visceral sensation of aggression.
       
     
   
  
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      Ariel Jackson      Home AKA Media Lab   , 2015    Including video works:     What Are the Blues?,    2015    Duration: 1:04 minutes     Blue Notes: Feelings 01, 2015                                         Duration: 0:15 loop     The Origin of the Blues,    2015    Duration: 4:17 minutes     B.A.M. aka By Any Means Inc.,    2015    Duration: 4:15 minutes     The Confuserella Show (AKA I Need A Shrink),    2012    Duration: 5:14 minutes    A commissioned work for NLE Lab    Ariel Jackson’s videos serve as a web of studies and reports that her primary character, Confuserella, collects based on her experience navigating the space-net. Confuserella, performed by Jackson, immigrated from the planet Panfrika to live in Plastica, and these short films chronicle her struggles to understand racial politics in an alien environment. Using characters to navigate both conceptual place and actual geopolitical and socioeconomic issues, Jackson’s immersive works create safe alternative spaces to consider real life traumas. 
       
     
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   (From Left to Right)      Anne Percoco and Ellie Irons         Next Epoch Seed Library   , 2015    Seeds from spontaneous plants collected from Bronx & elsewhere, wood, paper seed packets, pamphlets    A commissioned work for NLE Lab     Next Epoch Seed Library    catalogues the seeds of local weeds that grow on and around the Grand Concourse, creating an index of species that thrive in the dense and difficult urban environments constructed by humans. Merging built and natural environments, the work questions planned versus spontaneous growth and encourages closer examination of details that are often overlooked or marginalized         So Yoon Lym     Left to right:     Mariah   , 2010     Angel III   , 2011     Jhonathan   , 2010    All works acrylic on paper    Courtesy of the artist    So Yoon Lym’s topographical drawings of braided hair recall a “menu” of styles at a hair salon, but also urban streets, winding rivers, and farming plots. Focusing on hair as a key method to self-define, Lym’s intricate drawings reveal suggestions of place and history. Femininity, hair culture, and personal narratives are all entwined in these portraits that depict dense cartographies of Black experience.          
  
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      Amy Pryor      Sky above 40°45'6"N 73°59'39"W,    2015    Laser print    A commissioned work for NLE Lab    Working with junk mail and the packaging from her own consumer products, Amy Pryor reshapes the detritus of everyday life into landscapes, data, and aerial images. In  Sky above 40°45'6"N 73°59'39"W , Pryor creates a visual-verbal map of the 39 constellations visible from 900 Grand Concourse during November and December. This poetic interpretation of spatial coordinates charts existence and time through waste, blurring the lines between commerce, culture, and cosmos. 
       
     
   
  
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      Conversation Wall     As guests in this neighborhood, we support community efforts to preserve the histories and cultural identities of the South Bronx.     We hope that this space serves as a platform for engaging conversation for those who enter
       
     
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      Laura Napier      project for a street corner (Yankees),    2011     Video     Duration: 29 seconds    Courtesy of the artist    Working with the Bronx Museum Teen Council, Laura Napier’s  project for a street corner (Yankees)  documents a physical and symbolic confrontation between participating teens and baseball fans immediately before a game at an intersection near Yankee Stadium. Responding to the animosity that some locals feel regarding the infiltration of tourists during baseball season, the performative action both reclaims the streets of the neighborhood and suggests the preservation of locality. 
       
     
Opening Reception
       
     
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Intersecting Imaginaries
       
     
Intersecting Imaginaries

Curated by the 2015 NLE Lab

November 20 - December 13, 2015

900 Grand Concourse

 

Intersecting Imaginaries considers mapping as a method for understanding place, time, and identity. Including borrowed and commissioned works by Bronx-based and tri-state area artists, this site-responsive exhibition and related public programming explore a complex vision of the South Bronx, while drawing parallels with cities around the world.

The title of the exhibition draws from the philosophical concept of the social imaginary, which considers community to be composed of human interaction and perceived connection. Intersecting Imaginaries melds this abstract understanding with an acknowledgement of external circumstance, presenting a constellation of works that speak to memory and lived experience as composite parts of a map, and as the binding fibers of community. 

Facing the Bronx Supreme Courthouse, and mere blocks from Yankee Stadium, the storefront sits in a highly frequented intersection of the South Bronx. These landmarks, each controversial in their own right, arouse singular stories within a diverse borough that inform the cultural and sociopolitical discussion at the heart of the exhibition. The site has served many functions: it was once a ballroom as part of the Concourse Plaza Hotel, a diner, a thrift store, and now stands empty, sharing walls with housing provided by the Mid-Bronx Senior Citizen Council. Remnants of its former lives are evident in the raw space, serving as inspiration and context for works that navigate body politics, racial identity, communities in flux, and the natural environment as both separate and intersecting realities.

Artists: Elia Alba, Arthur Avilés and Nicolás Dumit Estévez, Bronx Photo League, Linda Cunningham, Josué Guarionex, Giorgio Guidi, Ariel Jackson, So Yoon Lym, Laura Napier, Anne Percoco and Ellie Irons, Amy Pryor, David Shrobe, Manuela Viera-Gallo

Curated by Natasha Bunzl, Dalaeja Foreman, Paola Gallio, Mary Kay Judy, Eva Mayhabal-Davis, Lindsey O’Connor, Walter Puryear, and Emilia Shaffer-Del Valle.

 

Programs

November 19, 2015

Preview for Mid-Bronx Senior Citizens Council Opening Reception: Intersecting Imaginaries

 

November 21, 2015

NLE Mixer: Meeting the No Longer Empty family and collaborators

 

December 02, 2015

Come Más Bronx Cuisine with Randal WilcoxThe Bronx Trolley: First Wednesday Arts & Culture Tour Stop

 

December 04, 2015

Artist talk with Ariel Jackson, Amy Pryor and Bronx Photo League

 

December 10, 2015

Panel Discussion: How Can We Unite to Preserve Our Communities?

 

December 12, 2015

NLE Curatorial Circle: Meeting emerging curators and professionals #NLEMeet A social media networking event

Closing Reception

 

December 13, 2015

Family Day with artist Giorgio Guidi: a Drawing Workshop at the Andrew Freedman Home

 

NLE Curatorial Lab (NLE Lab) is professional development program of No Longer Empty for emerging curators interested in gaining practical experience curating a site-specific exhibition. NLE Lab is designed as a socially conscious platform for experimentation in curating.

The 2015 NLE Lab is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and by the Dedalus Foundation and Puffin Foundation.

Installation views of Intersecting Imaginaries, curated by the 2015 NLE Lab. Photo: Tom Powel Imaging. Courtesy of No Longer Empty

   
  
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      Linda Cunningham      Surviving Then and Now: South Bronx Sagas,    2015    Found construction elements, collage, dry wall, canvas, photo transfers, pastel, acrylic, mixed media    A commissioned work for NLE Lab                                                            For 15 years, Linda Cunningham has been documenting the changing urban landscape of the Bronx, most recently through shredded drywall sculptures that reckon with memory, loss, and survival. Her sculptures record how nature permeates built environments, focusing on spaces where moisture invades architecture. Now, at a particularly contentious moment in the Bronx, her work finds new prescience and poignancy, engaging with transience and local history while questioning what remains and what is destroyed. 
       
     

Linda Cunningham

Surviving Then and Now: South Bronx Sagas, 2015

Found construction elements, collage, dry wall, canvas, photo transfers, pastel, acrylic, mixed media

A commissioned work for NLE Lab                                                        

For 15 years, Linda Cunningham has been documenting the changing urban landscape of the Bronx, most recently through shredded drywall sculptures that reckon with memory, loss, and survival. Her sculptures record how nature permeates built environments, focusing on spaces where moisture invades architecture. Now, at a particularly contentious moment in the Bronx, her work finds new prescience and poignancy, engaging with transience and local history while questioning what remains and what is destroyed. 

NLE_Lab15Fa_view_exhibition_TPI_010.jpg
       
     
   
  
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      Arthur Avilés and Nicolás Dumit Estévez      A Gentle Act of Men in Hunts Point,    2015    Part of  Performing the Bronx     Video    Duration: 22 minutes    Courtesy of the artists     In  Performing the Bronx , Arthur Avilés and Nicolás Dumit Estévez engage in an improvisational public action along Hunts Point Avenue focused on role-modeling kindness between men. Emphasizing banal actions, such as walking in the streets, Avilés and Estévez blur the boundary between everyday life and the performative act. The pair, using movement to promote gentleness, wears vestments designed by Lorenzo Walker and inspired by the clothing worn by Sufi Whirling Dervishes.    This project is made possible with public funds from the Bronx Council on the Arts through the Department of Cultural Affairs’ Greater New York Arts Development Fund Program.  Performing the Bronx  has also received support from Casita Maria and the Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance (BAAD!) and Mothers on the Move (MOM).           David Shrobe      Tight Rope   , 2015    Oil, ink, metal, wood, tile, paper, mixed media    Courtesy of the artist    In his mixed media wall installation    Tight Rope   , David Shrobe maps his environment via found materials collected in his Harlem neighborhood. Using tiles, moldings, and consumer packaging, Shrobe reclaims and re-presents these consumed and discarded items, creating a type of field guide by which to navigate the community. The detritus of the everyday is manipulated, transcending its original purpose and transforming into a remixed assemblage that at once examines the present and imagines the future.        
  
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      Laura Napier      project for a street corner (Yankees),    2011     Video     Duration: 29 seconds    Courtesy of the artist    Working with the Bronx Museum Teen Council, Laura Napier’s  project for a street corner (Yankees)  documents a physical and symbolic confrontation between participating teens and baseball fans immediately before a game at an intersection near Yankee Stadium. Responding to the animosity that some locals feel regarding the infiltration of tourists during baseball season, the performative action both reclaims the streets of the neighborhood and suggests the preservation of locality.
       
     

(From Left to Right)

Arthur Avilés and Nicolás Dumit Estévez

A Gentle Act of Men in Hunts Point, 2015

Part of Performing the Bronx

Video

Duration: 22 minutes

Courtesy of the artists

In Performing the Bronx, Arthur Avilés and Nicolás Dumit Estévez engage in an improvisational public action along Hunts Point Avenue focused on role-modeling kindness between men. Emphasizing banal actions, such as walking in the streets, Avilés and Estévez blur the boundary between everyday life and the performative act. The pair, using movement to promote gentleness, wears vestments designed by Lorenzo Walker and inspired by the clothing worn by Sufi Whirling Dervishes.

This project is made possible with public funds from the Bronx Council on the Arts through the Department of Cultural Affairs’ Greater New York Arts Development Fund Program. Performing the Bronx has also received support from Casita Maria and the Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance (BAAD!) and Mothers on the Move (MOM).

 

David Shrobe

Tight Rope, 2015

Oil, ink, metal, wood, tile, paper, mixed media

Courtesy of the artist

In his mixed media wall installation Tight Rope, David Shrobe maps his environment via found materials collected in his Harlem neighborhood. Using tiles, moldings, and consumer packaging, Shrobe reclaims and re-presents these consumed and discarded items, creating a type of field guide by which to navigate the community. The detritus of the everyday is manipulated, transcending its original purpose and transforming into a remixed assemblage that at once examines the present and imagines the future.

 

Laura Napier

project for a street corner (Yankees), 2011

Video

Duration: 29 seconds

Courtesy of the artist

Working with the Bronx Museum Teen Council, Laura Napier’s project for a street corner (Yankees) documents a physical and symbolic confrontation between participating teens and baseball fans immediately before a game at an intersection near Yankee Stadium. Responding to the animosity that some locals feel regarding the infiltration of tourists during baseball season, the performative action both reclaims the streets of the neighborhood and suggests the preservation of locality.

   
  
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      Josué Guarionex       Coffee Break   , 2014     From the series  The Pursuit of Power     Wooden gun and bullets, coffee machine    Courtesy of the artist    Josué   Guarionex’s  Coffee Break    maps the transatlantic slave trade, in which slaves, crops, and manufactured goods were trafficked between European colonies, West Africa, and the Caribbean. Considering the history of Caribbean coffee and sugar, the work reveals our silent complicity in the cyclical violence. Guarionex repurposes a coffee maker, a symbol of morning ritual and conversation, and literally ruptures that symbol, crystallizing our quotidian connections to systems of oppression.
       
     

Josué Guarionex

Coffee Break, 2014

From the series The Pursuit of Power

Wooden gun and bullets, coffee machine

Courtesy of the artist

Josué Guarionex’s Coffee Break maps the transatlantic slave trade, in which slaves, crops, and manufactured goods were trafficked between European colonies, West Africa, and the Caribbean. Considering the history of Caribbean coffee and sugar, the work reveals our silent complicity in the cyclical violence. Guarionex repurposes a coffee maker, a symbol of morning ritual and conversation, and literally ruptures that symbol, crystallizing our quotidian connections to systems of oppression.

   
  
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      Bronx Photo League       Jerome Avenue Workers Project   , 2015    Courtesy of The Bronx Photo League    The Bronx Photo League’s extensive documentary series,  Jerome Avenue Workers Project , sheds light on the people and professions that are threatened by the city’s plans to rezone two miles of Jerome Avenue for residential development. These nuanced portraits archive lived experiences under the strain of geopolitics and capture the ethos of one of New York’s last working class neighborhoods. Depicting workers’ individual relationships to the district, the images reveal the specter of displacement through a personal lens.       Jerome Avenue Workers Project    de parte del Bronx Photo League es una extensa serie documental que recalca las personas y las profesiones amenazadas a causa de los planes gubernativos para recalificar dos millas de la avenida Jerome para desarrollo residencial. Estos retratos son un archivo sútil de las experiencias vividas bajo la presión geopolítica, y capturan al espíritu de uno de los últimos barrios de clase trabajadora de Nueva York. Representando las relaciones individuales de trabajadores y el distrito, las imágenes revelan un espectro del aburguesamiento a través de una lente personal.          Michael Kamber     Oswaldo     1689 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY        Oswaldo stands in traffic on Jerome Avenue waving potential customers into a friend's auto glass shop. Men like Oswaldo are a key part of Jerome Avenue's economy.           Edwin Torres     Bella Santiago Rodriquez     Flat Fix Shop, 1245 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY     Bella Santiago Rodriquez, a 21-year-old native Brazilian, hangs around the Flat Fix Shop on     1245 Jerome Avenue, where she's made a new group of friends that she calls family. She came from Brazil five months ago because of family issues. She hopes to find work at one of the flat fix shops along Jerome Avenue.           Trevon Blondet     Royal “KingBee”     Jerome Ave and Buchannan Ave, Bronx NY     Royal "KingBee," a graffiti artist raised in the Bronx, takes a break from painting a large-scale mural near Jerome Avenue and Buchannan Avenue. He's been a graffiti artist since 1988 and has painted dozens of storefronts along Jerome Avenue.           Osaretin Ugiagbe     Girl at Islamic Cultural Center     1245 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY     A girl stands in front of the Bronx Islamic Cultural Center (Masjid Annasr) located at 50 Tremont Avenue. The center's Imam, Sheikh Ibrahim Gonja, expresses his fear of being pushed out of the neighborhood. The center has long played an important role in the community.            Netza Moreno     Pastor Nicanor González     Church of Living God, 1921 Walton Ave, Bronx NY     Nicanor González, 60, has been the pastor for 36 years at the Church of Living God, located at 1921 Walton Avenue, Bronx.          Melissa Bunni Elian      Bellissima Beauty     2175     Jerome Ave, Bronx NY     An unnamed client takes a cigarette break at Bellissima Beauty Studio at 2175 Jerome Avenue.          Elias Williams      Rubén and Roberto Vasquez      Vasquez Muffler Shop, 1275 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY     Brothers Rubén and Roberto Vasquez and their father, Pilar Antonio Vasquez, the owners of Vasquez Muffler located on 1275 Jerome Avenue. In operation since 1993, they pride themselves on offering auto and muffler repairs at affordable prices.            
  
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      Adi Talwar      Rebecca      God is Wonderful Hair Weave & Braiding Center, 2 W. 183 St, Bronx NY     Rebecca, originally from Ghana, works part-time at the GOD IS WONDERFUL Hair Weave & Braiding Center at Jerome and 183rd Street, which her sister Beatrice has owned for over ten years. Rebecca has been married for two years; she and her husband are both studying health care and she aspires to be a doctor.          Jesus Emmanuel      Mwanz     SE Corner of Burnside and Jerome Ave, Bronx NY     Mwanz, a street vendor who sells incense, accessories, and other holistic materials near the intersection of Burnside Avenue and Jerome Avenue.          Jonathan Santiago      Makilsi Rodriguez      Valencia Bakery, 1997 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY     Makilsi Rodriguez at the Valencia Bakery located on 1997 Jerome Avenue. She has been working as a sales clerk and decorator for over ten years.         Berthland Tekyi-Berto      Tony Ramos     Kerry Carte Barber Shop, 1476 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY     Tony Ramos gives one of his customers a haircut in Kerry Carte barber shop located at 1476 Jerome Avenue. Tony grew up in the neighborhood and has been working at the shop for the past 3 years.         Rhynna Santos     Miriam Maddi     1326 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY     Miriam Maddi has been an employee at the Botanica San Elias, located on 1326 Jerome Avenue, for the past five years. Born in the Dominican Republic, she came to the United States with her family eight years ago. Ms. Maddi dreams of one day owning her own health spa.         David "Dee" Delgado      Raymond Herskovits     Mel's Locksmiths, 4 E 170 St, Bronx NY     Raymond Herskovits inside his tiny storefront, Mel's Locksmiths, at 4 East 170th Street. Raymond is a third generation locksmith; his grandfather first opened the shop in 1932. Raymond no longer resides in the Bronx but commutes six days a week from his home in New Jersey to open his shop.         Heriberto Sanchez     Maria, Alexandro and Allen      Yadira Flower Shop, 6B E 183 St, Bronx NY     Maria and Miguel have been married for ten years; they have two children, Alexandro and Allen. Originally from Oaxaca, Mexico, Maria started selling flowers at a storefront. As her flower business grew she saved enough to open her own small flower shop six months ago.         Ed Alvarez     Marcos Rueda      American Flat Fix & Tire, 1331 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY    Marcos Rueda (left) and his co-worker Vladimir (right) wait for customers to arrive in front of American Flat Fix & Tire located at 1331 Jerome Avenue. Marcos has been working as a flat fix mechanic for the past two-and-a-half years at this shop and a previous eight years in another flat fix on Jerome Avenue.    
       
     

Bronx Photo League

Jerome Avenue Workers Project, 2015

Courtesy of The Bronx Photo League

The Bronx Photo League’s extensive documentary series, Jerome Avenue Workers Project, sheds light on the people and professions that are threatened by the city’s plans to rezone two miles of Jerome Avenue for residential development. These nuanced portraits archive lived experiences under the strain of geopolitics and capture the ethos of one of New York’s last working class neighborhoods. Depicting workers’ individual relationships to the district, the images reveal the specter of displacement through a personal lens. 

Jerome Avenue Workers Project de parte del Bronx Photo League es una extensa serie documental que recalca las personas y las profesiones amenazadas a causa de los planes gubernativos para recalificar dos millas de la avenida Jerome para desarrollo residencial. Estos retratos son un archivo sútil de las experiencias vividas bajo la presión geopolítica, y capturan al espíritu de uno de los últimos barrios de clase trabajadora de Nueva York. Representando las relaciones individuales de trabajadores y el distrito, las imágenes revelan un espectro del aburguesamiento a través de una lente personal.

 

Michael Kamber
Oswaldo
1689 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY  
Oswaldo stands in traffic on Jerome Avenue waving potential customers into a friend's auto glass shop. Men like Oswaldo are a key part of Jerome Avenue's economy.

Edwin Torres
Bella Santiago Rodriquez
Flat Fix Shop, 1245 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY
Bella Santiago Rodriquez, a 21-year-old native Brazilian, hangs around the Flat Fix Shop on 1245 Jerome Avenue, where she's made a new group of friends that she calls family. She came from Brazil five months ago because of family issues. She hopes to find work at one of the flat fix shops along Jerome Avenue.

Trevon Blondet
Royal “KingBee”
Jerome Ave and Buchannan Ave, Bronx NY
Royal "KingBee," a graffiti artist raised in the Bronx, takes a break from painting a large-scale mural near Jerome Avenue and Buchannan Avenue. He's been a graffiti artist since 1988 and has painted dozens of storefronts along Jerome Avenue.

Osaretin Ugiagbe
Girl at Islamic Cultural Center
1245 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY
A girl stands in front of the Bronx Islamic Cultural Center (Masjid Annasr) located at 50 Tremont Avenue. The center's Imam, Sheikh Ibrahim Gonja, expresses his fear of being pushed out of the neighborhood. The center has long played an important role in the community.

 

Netza Moreno
Pastor Nicanor González
Church of Living God, 1921 Walton Ave, Bronx NY
Nicanor González, 60, has been the pastor for 36 years at the Church of Living God, located at 1921 Walton Avenue, Bronx.
 

Melissa Bunni Elian
Bellissima Beauty
2175 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY
An unnamed client takes a cigarette break at Bellissima Beauty Studio at 2175 Jerome Avenue.
 

Elias Williams
Rubén and Roberto Vasquez
Vasquez Muffler Shop, 1275 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY
Brothers Rubén and Roberto Vasquez and their father, Pilar Antonio Vasquez, the owners of Vasquez Muffler located on 1275 Jerome Avenue. In operation since 1993, they pride themselves on offering auto and muffler repairs at affordable prices.

 

Adi Talwar
Rebecca
God is Wonderful Hair Weave & Braiding Center, 2 W. 183 St, Bronx NY
Rebecca, originally from Ghana, works part-time at the GOD IS WONDERFUL Hair Weave & Braiding Center at Jerome and 183rd Street, which her sister Beatrice has owned for over ten years. Rebecca has been married for two years; she and her husband are both studying health care and she aspires to be a doctor.
 

Jesus Emmanuel
Mwanz
SE Corner of Burnside and Jerome Ave, Bronx NY
Mwanz, a street vendor who sells incense, accessories, and other holistic materials near the intersection of Burnside Avenue and Jerome Avenue.
 

Jonathan Santiago
Makilsi Rodriguez
Valencia Bakery, 1997 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY
Makilsi Rodriguez at the Valencia Bakery located on 1997 Jerome Avenue. She has been working as a sales clerk and decorator for over ten years.
 

Berthland Tekyi-Berto
Tony Ramos
Kerry Carte Barber Shop, 1476 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY
Tony Ramos gives one of his customers a haircut in Kerry Carte barber shop located at 1476 Jerome Avenue. Tony grew up in the neighborhood and has been working at the shop for the past 3 years.
 

Rhynna Santos
Miriam Maddi
1326 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY
Miriam Maddi has been an employee at the Botanica San Elias, located on 1326 Jerome Avenue, for the past five years. Born in the Dominican Republic, she came to the United States with her family eight years ago. Ms. Maddi dreams of one day owning her own health spa.
 

David "Dee" Delgado
Raymond Herskovits
Mel's Locksmiths, 4 E 170 St, Bronx NY
Raymond Herskovits inside his tiny storefront, Mel's Locksmiths, at 4 East 170th Street. Raymond is a third generation locksmith; his grandfather first opened the shop in 1932. Raymond no longer resides in the Bronx but commutes six days a week from his home in New Jersey to open his shop.
 

Heriberto Sanchez
Maria, Alexandro and Allen
Yadira Flower Shop, 6B E 183 St, Bronx NY
Maria and Miguel have been married for ten years; they have two children, Alexandro and Allen. Originally from Oaxaca, Mexico, Maria started selling flowers at a storefront. As her flower business grew she saved enough to open her own small flower shop six months ago.
 

Ed Alvarez
Marcos Rueda
American Flat Fix & Tire, 1331 Jerome Ave, Bronx NY
Marcos Rueda (left) and his co-worker Vladimir (right) wait for customers to arrive in front of American Flat Fix & Tire located at 1331 Jerome Avenue. Marcos has been working as a flat fix mechanic for the past two-and-a-half years at this shop and a previous eight years in another flat fix on Jerome Avenue.
 

   
  
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      Giacomo Francia      Jerome Avenue Workers,    2015    Video    Duration: 25 minutes    Courtesy of The Bronx Photo League
       
     

Giacomo Francia

Jerome Avenue Workers, 2015

Video

Duration: 25 minutes

Courtesy of The Bronx Photo League

NLE_Lab15Fa_view_exhibition_TPI_002.jpg
       
     
   
  
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      Manuela Viera-Gallo      Morir Matando   , 2013    Part of the series  Domestic Violence     Cotton rope, broken ceramic plates, glasses    Courtesy of the artist    Manuela Viera-Gallo’s tightly bound and precariously hanging broken dishes are at once bodily and ghostly, evoking the troubling and pervasive reality of domestic violence. The fragments of porcelain and ceramic—once sophisticated home décor—are transformed into weapons charting the global and local existence of women’s oppression and abuse. Thick cotton ropes and tightly executed knots compound the visceral sensation of aggression.
       
     

Manuela Viera-Gallo

Morir Matando, 2013

Part of the series Domestic Violence

Cotton rope, broken ceramic plates, glasses

Courtesy of the artist

Manuela Viera-Gallo’s tightly bound and precariously hanging broken dishes are at once bodily and ghostly, evoking the troubling and pervasive reality of domestic violence. The fragments of porcelain and ceramic—once sophisticated home décor—are transformed into weapons charting the global and local existence of women’s oppression and abuse. Thick cotton ropes and tightly executed knots compound the visceral sensation of aggression.

   
  
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      Ariel Jackson      Home AKA Media Lab   , 2015    Including video works:     What Are the Blues?,    2015    Duration: 1:04 minutes     Blue Notes: Feelings 01, 2015                                         Duration: 0:15 loop     The Origin of the Blues,    2015    Duration: 4:17 minutes     B.A.M. aka By Any Means Inc.,    2015    Duration: 4:15 minutes     The Confuserella Show (AKA I Need A Shrink),    2012    Duration: 5:14 minutes    A commissioned work for NLE Lab    Ariel Jackson’s videos serve as a web of studies and reports that her primary character, Confuserella, collects based on her experience navigating the space-net. Confuserella, performed by Jackson, immigrated from the planet Panfrika to live in Plastica, and these short films chronicle her struggles to understand racial politics in an alien environment. Using characters to navigate both conceptual place and actual geopolitical and socioeconomic issues, Jackson’s immersive works create safe alternative spaces to consider real life traumas. 
       
     

Ariel Jackson

Home AKA Media Lab, 2015

Including video works:

What Are the Blues?, 2015

Duration: 1:04 minutes

Blue Notes: Feelings 01, 2015                                   

Duration: 0:15 loop

The Origin of the Blues, 2015

Duration: 4:17 minutes

B.A.M. aka By Any Means Inc., 2015

Duration: 4:15 minutes

The Confuserella Show (AKA I Need A Shrink), 2012

Duration: 5:14 minutes

A commissioned work for NLE Lab

Ariel Jackson’s videos serve as a web of studies and reports that her primary character, Confuserella, collects based on her experience navigating the space-net. Confuserella, performed by Jackson, immigrated from the planet Panfrika to live in Plastica, and these short films chronicle her struggles to understand racial politics in an alien environment. Using characters to navigate both conceptual place and actual geopolitical and socioeconomic issues, Jackson’s immersive works create safe alternative spaces to consider real life traumas. 

NLE_Lab15Fa_view_exhibition_TPI_005.jpg
       
     
NLE_Lab15Fa_view_exhibition_TPI_012.jpg
       
     
   
  
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   (From Left to Right)      Anne Percoco and Ellie Irons         Next Epoch Seed Library   , 2015    Seeds from spontaneous plants collected from Bronx & elsewhere, wood, paper seed packets, pamphlets    A commissioned work for NLE Lab     Next Epoch Seed Library    catalogues the seeds of local weeds that grow on and around the Grand Concourse, creating an index of species that thrive in the dense and difficult urban environments constructed by humans. Merging built and natural environments, the work questions planned versus spontaneous growth and encourages closer examination of details that are often overlooked or marginalized         So Yoon Lym     Left to right:     Mariah   , 2010     Angel III   , 2011     Jhonathan   , 2010    All works acrylic on paper    Courtesy of the artist    So Yoon Lym’s topographical drawings of braided hair recall a “menu” of styles at a hair salon, but also urban streets, winding rivers, and farming plots. Focusing on hair as a key method to self-define, Lym’s intricate drawings reveal suggestions of place and history. Femininity, hair culture, and personal narratives are all entwined in these portraits that depict dense cartographies of Black experience.          
  
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      Amy Pryor      Sky above 40°45'6"N 73°59'39"W,    2015    Laser print    A commissioned work for NLE Lab    Working with junk mail and the packaging from her own consumer products, Amy Pryor reshapes the detritus of everyday life into landscapes, data, and aerial images. In  Sky above 40°45'6"N 73°59'39"W , Pryor creates a visual-verbal map of the 39 constellations visible from 900 Grand Concourse during November and December. This poetic interpretation of spatial coordinates charts existence and time through waste, blurring the lines between commerce, culture, and cosmos. 
       
     

(From Left to Right)

Anne Percoco and Ellie Irons

Next Epoch Seed Library, 2015

Seeds from spontaneous plants collected from Bronx & elsewhere, wood, paper seed packets, pamphlets

A commissioned work for NLE Lab

Next Epoch Seed Library catalogues the seeds of local weeds that grow on and around the Grand Concourse, creating an index of species that thrive in the dense and difficult urban environments constructed by humans. Merging built and natural environments, the work questions planned versus spontaneous growth and encourages closer examination of details that are often overlooked or marginalized

 

So Yoon Lym

Left to right:

Mariah, 2010

Angel III, 2011

Jhonathan, 2010

All works acrylic on paper

Courtesy of the artist

So Yoon Lym’s topographical drawings of braided hair recall a “menu” of styles at a hair salon, but also urban streets, winding rivers, and farming plots. Focusing on hair as a key method to self-define, Lym’s intricate drawings reveal suggestions of place and history. Femininity, hair culture, and personal narratives are all entwined in these portraits that depict dense cartographies of Black experience. 

 

Amy Pryor

Sky above 40°45'6"N 73°59'39"W, 2015

Laser print

A commissioned work for NLE Lab

Working with junk mail and the packaging from her own consumer products, Amy Pryor reshapes the detritus of everyday life into landscapes, data, and aerial images. In Sky above 40°45'6"N 73°59'39"W, Pryor creates a visual-verbal map of the 39 constellations visible from 900 Grand Concourse during November and December. This poetic interpretation of spatial coordinates charts existence and time through waste, blurring the lines between commerce, culture, and cosmos. 

   
  
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      Conversation Wall     As guests in this neighborhood, we support community efforts to preserve the histories and cultural identities of the South Bronx.     We hope that this space serves as a platform for engaging conversation for those who enter
       
     

Conversation Wall

As guests in this neighborhood, we support community efforts to preserve the histories and cultural identities of the South Bronx.

We hope that this space serves as a platform for engaging conversation for those who enter

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      Laura Napier      project for a street corner (Yankees),    2011     Video     Duration: 29 seconds    Courtesy of the artist    Working with the Bronx Museum Teen Council, Laura Napier’s  project for a street corner (Yankees)  documents a physical and symbolic confrontation between participating teens and baseball fans immediately before a game at an intersection near Yankee Stadium. Responding to the animosity that some locals feel regarding the infiltration of tourists during baseball season, the performative action both reclaims the streets of the neighborhood and suggests the preservation of locality. 
       
     

Laura Napier

project for a street corner (Yankees), 2011

Video

Duration: 29 seconds

Courtesy of the artist

Working with the Bronx Museum Teen Council, Laura Napier’s project for a street corner (Yankees) documents a physical and symbolic confrontation between participating teens and baseball fans immediately before a game at an intersection near Yankee Stadium. Responding to the animosity that some locals feel regarding the infiltration of tourists during baseball season, the performative action both reclaims the streets of the neighborhood and suggests the preservation of locality. 

Opening Reception
       
     
Opening Reception

INTERSECTING IMAGINARIES

900 Grand Concourse storefront | November 20–December 13, 2015

Location: 900 Grand Concourse (at 161 Street), Bronx

Opening reception: Thursday, November 19, 7–10pm

On view: November 20–December 13, 2015

Viewing hours: Wednesday–Friday, 2–8pm; Saturday & Sunday 12–6pm

Opening reception for Intersecting Imaginaries, curated by the 2015 NLE Lab. Photo: Whitney Browne. Courtesy of No Longer Empty.

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