BLACK FOLK presents: Reclaimed Rage; Resistance
       
     
 Opening Reception photos by Jay Espy
       
     
IMG_7513_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7578_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8005_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8069_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8073_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7536_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7989_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8122_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8117_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8100_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8209_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8207_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7993_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7928_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8177_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8042_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8161_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8142_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8123_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8163_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7919_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7526_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8047_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8024_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7905_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7596_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7959_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7575_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7563_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7573_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8083_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8195_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8051_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7936_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7951_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7899_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7710_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7694_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7734_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7802_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7792_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7886_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7871_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7756_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7657_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7645_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7557_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7512_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7981_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7979_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7978_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8266_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8214_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8288_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8273_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8313_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
RRR_Flyer_Final_2.15_Front.png
       
     
RRR_Flyer_Final_2.15_Back.png
       
     
IMG_6122.jpg
       
     
 For Adam Abdul Hakeem  Shellyne Rodriguez  Mix Media  2017  5x6’     Larry Davis’ sentencing and later death was the result of a corrupt NYPD and the underlying systematic control of the black community through repression. While in his youth, Davis was forced to sell drugs by the corrupt 40th precinct, dubbed Fort Apache for its violence on people of the south bronx, Davis refused and was met with 30 police of cers raiding his sister’s apartment. Davis shot 6 of cers and was incarcerated for 25 years on trumped charges. His de ance became political dynamite, Davis would later be murdered in a ght with another inmate the day before he was to be interviewed. Davis is immor- talized through his in uence in hip hop, his refusing the scare tactics of the NYPD and remains a folklore hero and icon of resistance in the South Bronx.
       
     
IMG_5993.jpg
       
     
 (Left to Right)  Mirage II  Shellyne Rodriguez  Ceramic  2016  13x15”     The Lovers  Cheyenne Julien  acrylic on stretched paper  2014  10x10”     Last, one home  Anthony J. Thomas  Mixed Media on Canvas.  (Denim, Glass, Newspaper, Rubber reclaimed from automobile tubes, Acrylic Paint)  2012  36” x 48”     Grillz #1  Jonathan Gardenhire  Digital C-Print  2014  14x18”     Adentro de una Gota de Sangre  Clara Lenor Cruz  Oil on Canvas  2014  48x36”     The upside down flag acts as an absorber/catalyst of the good, the bad and the ugly. A signal of a country in distress. Whether it be the resistance of self appreciation through royalty association and black love as a pure and dignified political act, or, the lived experiences that create self destruction and systemic martyrdom; this rage is the product of a tragic and destructive system.  Like the The Picture of Dorian Gray, Thomas’ work absorbs all of the painful and reckless truths, hidden from the public eye. Although it is a natural expression of grief, rage is often demonized. We must acknowledge the conditions that create our rage to understand how to use it righteously as a guiding point for our liberation.
       
     
IMG_8198_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7591_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
 There Are No Second Chances Here,  Watercolor on Paper  2017   Each portrait is 11”x15”  Participating Artists: Cris Reyes, Kaleb Stobbs, Ronaldo Diaz, Iyanna Pearce, Aiasha Anderson, Johnathan Diaz, Ymari Bartley, D’Andre Greene, Kylie Prophet, Mercedes Jenkins, Jaydon Barajona, Silyna Melvin, Garry Ro- driguez, Abel Perez, Karla Melo, Dalanda Jallow, Aaliyah Paster, Chelsea Nolasco, Trevor Prophet, Anne Marie Colon, Rusmelyn Paulino, Greily Gon- zalez, Kyera Gaines, Yadiasa Bah, Albin Guzman, Samantha Silverio, Jaylis Ortiz, Stellamaris Rafua, Nereida Figueroa, Henry Gonzalez, Shanel Jaquez, Miguel Del Rosario, Jamari Mitchell, Alyssa Skerret, Masiel Perez, Carlos Mendoza, Alexis Goodwin, Amanda Bailey, Joseph Resto, Nydaysha Pol- lock, Louis Hernandez, Stephanie Bravo, Ty’Quan Buchanan, Gessel Are- valo, Adrian Hislop, Keila Balen, Nathaniel Melvin, Elijah Rosa, Dominique Brisbane, Lianis Rodriguez, Jennyffer Siavichay, Aquaysia Sheppard, Mariah Gutierrez, Alicia Anderson, Faith Skerrett, Isaiah Montero, and Javon Gaines  Project Designer and Facilitator: Traci Molloy  Co-Facilitators: Marilyn Byrd, Danny Colon, Stewart Wagner, Paula Dallac- qua, Daniel Nohejl, and Ryan O’Connell Additional Support from: Nathan Larson, Jeff Paladino, and Valerie McKee         There Are No Second Chances Here  is a collaborative portrait project made in partnership with 9th and 10th grade students at Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom High School (FLH) in the Bronx. The artwork was made to honor the lives of the Black and Latinx men and women killed by police officers in America in 2016.  It was also meant to call into question issues of institutional racism, mental health discrimination, police brutality, mass incarceration, violence, profiling, and oppression affecting this country.  Before beginning the portrait paintings, students studied the Haitian Revolution in depth, analyzing complex ideas related to oppression and revolt. They then drew comparisons between the Haitian Revolution to aspects of the U.S. Slave trade, the Civil Rights Movement (with an emphasis on the murder of Emmett Till), and the Black Lives Matter Movement (with an emphasis on the murder of Trayvon Martin). This information served as the backdrop for the portrait project.  The subject matter for this project was found via researching The Guardian’s  “The Counted: People Killed by Police in the U.S.”  The initial portraits were provided by the Visiting Artist. FLH students independently researched their individual to determine the direction of their project and the descriptive biographical text. They also composed their respective background imagery, color scheme, and typographic designs that accompanied the paintings.  More than 250 portraits were generated for this project. 30% of the people killed last year are represented in this exhibition. All of the deaths occurred during the calendar year of 2016. Some of the deaths made national news. The vast majority of them did not. Many of the people killed had previous police records. Many did not. Some people struggled with serious mental health issues, such as bipolar disorder, PTSD, and depression. The ages of the deceased ranged from 13-64.    - Traci Molloy  Visiting Artist and Project Facilitator      Reflections on this project from the FLH students       This was an art piece that showed the true side of the people that were killed by policeman. Not all of them were good, and not all of them were bad, but all of them were part of the minority. Seeing all the faces was really heartbreaking because with every line I traced, I thought about how it could've been me .     - Hector Aponte      The reason for this project was to acknowledge the young Black and Hispanic youth that lost their lives to police brutality. Crime is high in low-income areas because of desperation. People sometimes depend on illegal activities to make a living. There is also institutional racism.   - Faith Skerritt                Black people rarely get second chances when they commit a crime. Meanwhile a white man kills multiple people in a movie theater and he gets no jail time. Instead they label him “mentally ill”. A wise brother told me once wherever poverty is, there will be hunger, and wherever hunger is, there will be needs, and when somebody needs, they will do whatever they can to feed their needs, whether it is legal or illegal. From this project, I was able to learn about people who never got a second chance – men who were never given the opportunity to change their lives around.”   - Miguel Del Rosario      This project taught me what each person went through, and all the events that led up to their death. When I see all the pieces hanging together, I will feel sad. We need to change the way things are and make a difference.”   - Carilee Torruella
       
     
IMG_0016.jpg
       
     
IMG_8205_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_6049.jpg
       
     
IMG_0806.JPG
       
     
IMG_0023.jpg
       
     
 (Left to Right)     Strange Fruit (99¢ Series)  MIlo Matthieu  Mixed Media  2016  26.75 x 25.5”     Jim Crow (99¢ Series)  MIlo Matthieu  Mixed Media  2016  26.75” x 25.5”     The Charmer (99¢ Series)  MIlo Matthieu  Mixed Media  2017  48” x 32”     Untitled Dinner Rendezvous (A HOME AWAY Series)  MIlo Matthieu  Mixed Media  2016  12 x 16”     Untitled Portrait (A HOME AWAY series)  MIlo Matthieu  Mixed Media  2016  10”x10”     Rage and societal oppressions, encouraged by white supremacists heteropatriarchal capitalism destroy our perceptions of ourselves, by imposing standards that were created on the basis of being anti-black. As we internalize these standards as an attempt to assimilate we must take a step back and truly reflect; understanding that self-policing and adhering to oppressive standards will never liberate us. The centrality of the Black/African Diasporan experience is key to the liberation of the United States. All institutions in this country have been perverted and contorted to become tools of oppression. From religion being used as an instrument of enslavement to eurocentric standards as a device of psychological terrorism.  We must truly ask ourselves, Whose interest does self hatred serve? Matthieu’s works speak to the concepts of Good and evil, one would not exist with- out the other. The stark use of black and white amplify the relationship between the oppressor and the oppressed. The oppressors could not exist without the op- pressed but the oppressed can thrive without the oppressors. Once WE, working- class people, gain control over all of the institutions that govern our lives, society will be put on an equal playing eld.
       
     
IMG_0058.jpg
       
     
 (Left to Right)  Untitled (Chanya)  Adrienne Rose  Newsprint  2016  16x20”     Space & Time  Shellyne Rodriguez  Collage  2016  10 x 12”     Untitled (Max)  Adrienne Rose  Newsprint  2016  16x20”     When the Firmaments Come Crashing Down...What?  Shellyne Rodriguez  Mix Media  Collage  2016  12 x 22”   
       
     
IMG_6106.jpg
       
     
 Stargazer  Cheyenne Julien  Acrylic on Canvas  2016  30”x36”     (From Right to Left)  F.U.B.U. Cheyenne Julien  Oil on Canvas  2013  18”x24”     Untitled (Girl with Flower)  Cheyenne Julien  Acrylic on canvas  2016  12”x16”     Self Portrait  Cheyenne Julien  Acrylic on canvas  2015  12”x14”     Identity Crisis  Cheyenne Julien  acrylic on canvas  2015  10”x12”     By imagining our own realities, we can create alternatives for the institutions that devalue us. Julien uses bright colors and abstraction as a humanizing tool, challenges the viewer to define self and societal influences by their own terms while acknowledging the contractions of existing in a system that is meant to destroy you.  The action of black abstraction is a device that must be used and has been used throughout history for imagining alternatives. During these times of continued but increased oppressions, the black imagination is pivotal to our survival.
       
     
IMG_0810.JPG
       
     
IMG_8014_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_0820.JPG
       
     
 (Back Wall, Left to Right)     Origin of the World  Jonathan Gardenhire  Digital C-Print  2013  24x36”     Untitled, (Black Confession/American Hunger 1943-2017)  Jonathan Gardenhire  Archival Pigment Print  2017  30x20”     Untitled, 1 of 3 (2014)  Adrienne Rose  Newsprint  2014     Untitled, 2 of 3 (2014)  Adrienne Rose  Newsprint  2014     Untitled, 3 of 3 (2014)  Adrienne Rose  Newsprint  2014     Untitled  Anthony J. Thomas  Mixed-Media  2017  Various     In conversation, Gardenhire and Rose’s works tell a story of personal liberation through process. Rose’s triptych self-portrait is the epitome of resistance. By boldly reclaiming her selfhood she seemingly shakes off the demons of yesterday, removing the illusions. By quoting novelist and icon, Richard Wright, Gardenhire proclaims a narrative all too familiar to working-class people; the Amerikkka that we know to be true, very different from the ”America” mainstream society claims it to be. Finally, Garden- hire’s Origin of the World expresses the action of education/personal study as a tool of defense against the false narratives imposed on working-class communities (often kept intentionally unattainable). From Left to Right, the works tell a similar story of process; by disillusioning self with education as the catalyst.
       
     
IMG_6074.jpg
       
     
IMG_8297_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
Sarah E. Wright & Joe Kaye Political Education Center
       
     
IMG_0005.jpg
       
     
 (Brick Wall, From Left to Right)     Untitled, (Shomari), 2013-2017  Jonathan Gardenhire  Archival PIgment Print  2013-2017  50x40”     Terrible and Beautiful  Shani Peters  Laser cut wood words - diptych  2016  Both 12x16”     Eternal, Every Time  Shani Peters  Laser cut wood words - diptych  2016  Both 12x16”     Rise Set  Shani Peters  Laser cut wood words - diptych  2016  Both 12x16”     Within the context of a dehumanizing society, the act of intimacy and self acknowledgment is a way to resist state-inflicted destruction. The institutions that oppress working-class communities bene t from our internal devaluation. As we create new & empower existing narratives for ourselves and our communities, we must re- member to question the concepts of blackness, latinidad, sexuality, gender, visibility, citizenship,etc. that have been imposed on us from people that do not have our interests in mind.  In the age of perceived wokeness and more blatant oppression; working-class communities can not afford to ignore the cause of our troubling conditions. As people (especially womyn of color) who have been consistently on the front lines of every struggle for liberation we must acknowledge our rightful place as leaders and revolutionaries in a capitalist system that exists to exploit us for everything we have. By appropriating terms from revolutionary thinkers like James Baldwin, on wood, Peters speaks to the ways in which people, like wood are subject to their conditions and must welcome the contradictions of our experience with open arms to confront the core of our issues.
       
     
IMG_8204_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
 Pheonix (Calling on the Spirit of the Garbage Offensive)  Shellyne Rodriguez  Assemblage  2015  4.5 x 2 x 3’.     The broom is reminiscent of a past of movements and social uproar that pushed young and old from the east harlem hoods to rede ne themselves. “Cleaning the Garbage” had become a campaign that would lead to garbage piled in the middle of the roads and set on re. Popular support for The Young Lords organization and the self-determination of the Puerto Rican community in the U.S was born out of the ashes. The teeth signify striking back and confronting the systemic issues plagu- ing our people, and our communities. Rage becomes a tool for empowerment and honoring our experiences.
       
     
IMG_0816.JPG
       
     
IMG_0068.jpg
       
     
IMG_0019.jpg
       
     
IMG_0018.jpg
       
     
BLACK FOLK presents: Reclaimed Rage; Resistance
       
     
BLACK FOLK presents: Reclaimed Rage; Resistance

February 9 - March 11, 2017

Opening Reception & Open Mic with Uptown Vinyl Supreme & Performance by NMBR 09: Thursday, February 9, 5PM

BronxArtSpace

305 E 140 St, 1A 

Bronx, NY 10454

Francheska Alcantara, Clara Lenor Cruz, Jonathan Gardenhire, Cheyenne Julien, Milo Matthieu, Shani Peters, Shellyne Rodriguez, Adrienne Rose, Anthony J. Thomas & Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom High School Students

 

According to Kenneth V. Hardy and Tracey A. Laszloffy's sociological study “Therapy with African Americans and The Phenomenon of Rage” (1995), rage is a sustained and intense emotion; it tends to develop gradually over a protracted period of time. It can be both functional and dysfunctional. The functional component may be a protective mechanism of resistance or a buffer against the trauma of oppression. The dysfunctional occurs when rage is internalized, several destructive manifestations tend to occur. When expressed, rage can have a soothing effect by providing an emotional release of the pain and humiliation associated with subjugation.

 

Reclaimed Rage; Resistance is an experiential group exhibition of contemporary artists working with photography, sculpture, collage and painting that explores the importance of rage in the age of resistance. By collaborating with revolutionary working-class-centered organizations and collectives across the Bronx, Reclaimed Rage; Resistance seeks to become an incubator for influencing community-empowering action and dialogue around the inevitable rage of an oppressive system.

 

The exhibition will also launch People Power Movement'sSarah E. Wright & Joe Kaye Political Education Center. A mobile library honoring 60+ years of tremendous political work and writings of Sarah E. Wright and Joe Kaye, their dedication to the liberation of working class people around the world was a core inspiration for this exhibition. Guests are encouraged to connect, reflect, and start meaningful dialogue in the mobile library. Black Folk, has also produced a Community Resource Zine in collaboration with People Power Movement, Eztudio 43, and The Women’s Press Collective with key information on community resources and engagement in and around the South Bronx.

 

The exhibition is curated by Dalaeja Foreman and co-organized by the aesthetic collective, Black Folk

 

Collaborators

Bronx Social Center

Eztudio 43

NMBR 09

Odiosas

People Power Movement

Uptown Vinyl Supreme

Women's Press Collective

 

Program Schedule

Political Education Sessions & Workshops w/ People Power Movement

Formations in Community - Embodying Rage to Resistance

Tuesday, February 14, 6:30pm & Thursday, February 16, 6:30pm

 

Black Women & Survival as Resistance: Using the Work of Sarah E. Wright

Wednesday, February 22, 6:00pm-7:30pm

 

Decoding the “Angry Black Woman/Man”

Saturday, March 4, 6:30pm

 

Privitization of Public Housing

Sunday, March 5, 6:30pm

 

Regular Degular Feminism Workshop w/ Odiosas

Friday, February 24, 6-8pm

 

Curatorial Conversation on Trolley Night

Wednesday, March 1, 6:30pm

 

Curso De Defensa Contra El Desalojo // Anti-Displacement Defense Course w/ Eztudio 43

Saturday, March 4, 3-5pm & Saturday, March 11 , 3-5pm 

 Opening Reception photos by Jay Espy
       
     

Opening Reception photos by Jay Espy

IMG_7513_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7578_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8005_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8069_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8073_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7536_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7989_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8122_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8117_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8100_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8209_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8207_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7993_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7928_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8177_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8042_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8161_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8142_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8123_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8163_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7919_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7526_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8047_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8024_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7905_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7596_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7959_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7575_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7563_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7573_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8083_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8195_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8051_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7936_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7951_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7899_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7710_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7694_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7734_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7802_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7792_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7886_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7871_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7756_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7657_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7645_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7557_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7512_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7981_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7979_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7978_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8266_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8214_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8288_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8273_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_8313_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
RRR_Flyer_Final_2.15_Front.png
       
     
RRR_Flyer_Final_2.15_Back.png
       
     
IMG_6122.jpg
       
     
 For Adam Abdul Hakeem  Shellyne Rodriguez  Mix Media  2017  5x6’     Larry Davis’ sentencing and later death was the result of a corrupt NYPD and the underlying systematic control of the black community through repression. While in his youth, Davis was forced to sell drugs by the corrupt 40th precinct, dubbed Fort Apache for its violence on people of the south bronx, Davis refused and was met with 30 police of cers raiding his sister’s apartment. Davis shot 6 of cers and was incarcerated for 25 years on trumped charges. His de ance became political dynamite, Davis would later be murdered in a ght with another inmate the day before he was to be interviewed. Davis is immor- talized through his in uence in hip hop, his refusing the scare tactics of the NYPD and remains a folklore hero and icon of resistance in the South Bronx.
       
     

For Adam Abdul Hakeem

Shellyne Rodriguez

Mix Media

2017

5x6’

 

Larry Davis’ sentencing and later death was the result of a corrupt NYPD and the underlying systematic control of the black community through repression. While in his youth, Davis was forced to sell drugs by the corrupt 40th precinct, dubbed Fort Apache for its violence on people of the south bronx, Davis refused and was met with 30 police of cers raiding his sister’s apartment. Davis shot 6 of cers and was incarcerated for 25 years on trumped charges. His de ance became political dynamite, Davis would later be murdered in a ght with another inmate the day before he was to be interviewed. Davis is immor- talized through his in uence in hip hop, his refusing the scare tactics of the NYPD and remains a folklore hero and icon of resistance in the South Bronx.

IMG_5993.jpg
       
     
 (Left to Right)  Mirage II  Shellyne Rodriguez  Ceramic  2016  13x15”     The Lovers  Cheyenne Julien  acrylic on stretched paper  2014  10x10”     Last, one home  Anthony J. Thomas  Mixed Media on Canvas.  (Denim, Glass, Newspaper, Rubber reclaimed from automobile tubes, Acrylic Paint)  2012  36” x 48”     Grillz #1  Jonathan Gardenhire  Digital C-Print  2014  14x18”     Adentro de una Gota de Sangre  Clara Lenor Cruz  Oil on Canvas  2014  48x36”     The upside down flag acts as an absorber/catalyst of the good, the bad and the ugly. A signal of a country in distress. Whether it be the resistance of self appreciation through royalty association and black love as a pure and dignified political act, or, the lived experiences that create self destruction and systemic martyrdom; this rage is the product of a tragic and destructive system.  Like the The Picture of Dorian Gray, Thomas’ work absorbs all of the painful and reckless truths, hidden from the public eye. Although it is a natural expression of grief, rage is often demonized. We must acknowledge the conditions that create our rage to understand how to use it righteously as a guiding point for our liberation.
       
     

(Left to Right)

Mirage II

Shellyne Rodriguez

Ceramic

2016

13x15”

 

The Lovers

Cheyenne Julien

acrylic on stretched paper

2014

10x10”

 

Last, one home

Anthony J. Thomas

Mixed Media on Canvas.

(Denim, Glass, Newspaper, Rubber reclaimed from automobile tubes, Acrylic Paint)

2012

36” x 48”

 

Grillz #1

Jonathan Gardenhire

Digital C-Print

2014

14x18”

 

Adentro de una Gota de Sangre

Clara Lenor Cruz

Oil on Canvas

2014

48x36”

 

The upside down flag acts as an absorber/catalyst of the good, the bad and the ugly. A signal of a country in distress. Whether it be the resistance of self appreciation through royalty association and black love as a pure and dignified political act, or, the lived experiences that create self destruction and systemic martyrdom; this rage is the product of a tragic and destructive system.

Like the The Picture of Dorian Gray, Thomas’ work absorbs all of the painful and reckless truths, hidden from the public eye. Although it is a natural expression of grief, rage is often demonized. We must acknowledge the conditions that create our rage to understand how to use it righteously as a guiding point for our liberation.

IMG_8198_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_7591_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
 There Are No Second Chances Here,  Watercolor on Paper  2017   Each portrait is 11”x15”  Participating Artists: Cris Reyes, Kaleb Stobbs, Ronaldo Diaz, Iyanna Pearce, Aiasha Anderson, Johnathan Diaz, Ymari Bartley, D’Andre Greene, Kylie Prophet, Mercedes Jenkins, Jaydon Barajona, Silyna Melvin, Garry Ro- driguez, Abel Perez, Karla Melo, Dalanda Jallow, Aaliyah Paster, Chelsea Nolasco, Trevor Prophet, Anne Marie Colon, Rusmelyn Paulino, Greily Gon- zalez, Kyera Gaines, Yadiasa Bah, Albin Guzman, Samantha Silverio, Jaylis Ortiz, Stellamaris Rafua, Nereida Figueroa, Henry Gonzalez, Shanel Jaquez, Miguel Del Rosario, Jamari Mitchell, Alyssa Skerret, Masiel Perez, Carlos Mendoza, Alexis Goodwin, Amanda Bailey, Joseph Resto, Nydaysha Pol- lock, Louis Hernandez, Stephanie Bravo, Ty’Quan Buchanan, Gessel Are- valo, Adrian Hislop, Keila Balen, Nathaniel Melvin, Elijah Rosa, Dominique Brisbane, Lianis Rodriguez, Jennyffer Siavichay, Aquaysia Sheppard, Mariah Gutierrez, Alicia Anderson, Faith Skerrett, Isaiah Montero, and Javon Gaines  Project Designer and Facilitator: Traci Molloy  Co-Facilitators: Marilyn Byrd, Danny Colon, Stewart Wagner, Paula Dallac- qua, Daniel Nohejl, and Ryan O’Connell Additional Support from: Nathan Larson, Jeff Paladino, and Valerie McKee         There Are No Second Chances Here  is a collaborative portrait project made in partnership with 9th and 10th grade students at Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom High School (FLH) in the Bronx. The artwork was made to honor the lives of the Black and Latinx men and women killed by police officers in America in 2016.  It was also meant to call into question issues of institutional racism, mental health discrimination, police brutality, mass incarceration, violence, profiling, and oppression affecting this country.  Before beginning the portrait paintings, students studied the Haitian Revolution in depth, analyzing complex ideas related to oppression and revolt. They then drew comparisons between the Haitian Revolution to aspects of the U.S. Slave trade, the Civil Rights Movement (with an emphasis on the murder of Emmett Till), and the Black Lives Matter Movement (with an emphasis on the murder of Trayvon Martin). This information served as the backdrop for the portrait project.  The subject matter for this project was found via researching The Guardian’s  “The Counted: People Killed by Police in the U.S.”  The initial portraits were provided by the Visiting Artist. FLH students independently researched their individual to determine the direction of their project and the descriptive biographical text. They also composed their respective background imagery, color scheme, and typographic designs that accompanied the paintings.  More than 250 portraits were generated for this project. 30% of the people killed last year are represented in this exhibition. All of the deaths occurred during the calendar year of 2016. Some of the deaths made national news. The vast majority of them did not. Many of the people killed had previous police records. Many did not. Some people struggled with serious mental health issues, such as bipolar disorder, PTSD, and depression. The ages of the deceased ranged from 13-64.    - Traci Molloy  Visiting Artist and Project Facilitator      Reflections on this project from the FLH students       This was an art piece that showed the true side of the people that were killed by policeman. Not all of them were good, and not all of them were bad, but all of them were part of the minority. Seeing all the faces was really heartbreaking because with every line I traced, I thought about how it could've been me .     - Hector Aponte      The reason for this project was to acknowledge the young Black and Hispanic youth that lost their lives to police brutality. Crime is high in low-income areas because of desperation. People sometimes depend on illegal activities to make a living. There is also institutional racism.   - Faith Skerritt                Black people rarely get second chances when they commit a crime. Meanwhile a white man kills multiple people in a movie theater and he gets no jail time. Instead they label him “mentally ill”. A wise brother told me once wherever poverty is, there will be hunger, and wherever hunger is, there will be needs, and when somebody needs, they will do whatever they can to feed their needs, whether it is legal or illegal. From this project, I was able to learn about people who never got a second chance – men who were never given the opportunity to change their lives around.”   - Miguel Del Rosario      This project taught me what each person went through, and all the events that led up to their death. When I see all the pieces hanging together, I will feel sad. We need to change the way things are and make a difference.”   - Carilee Torruella
       
     

There Are No Second Chances Here,

Watercolor on Paper

2017

Each portrait is 11”x15”

Participating Artists: Cris Reyes, Kaleb Stobbs, Ronaldo Diaz, Iyanna Pearce, Aiasha Anderson, Johnathan Diaz, Ymari Bartley, D’Andre Greene, Kylie Prophet, Mercedes Jenkins, Jaydon Barajona, Silyna Melvin, Garry Ro- driguez, Abel Perez, Karla Melo, Dalanda Jallow, Aaliyah Paster, Chelsea Nolasco, Trevor Prophet, Anne Marie Colon, Rusmelyn Paulino, Greily Gon- zalez, Kyera Gaines, Yadiasa Bah, Albin Guzman, Samantha Silverio, Jaylis Ortiz, Stellamaris Rafua, Nereida Figueroa, Henry Gonzalez, Shanel Jaquez, Miguel Del Rosario, Jamari Mitchell, Alyssa Skerret, Masiel Perez, Carlos Mendoza, Alexis Goodwin, Amanda Bailey, Joseph Resto, Nydaysha Pol- lock, Louis Hernandez, Stephanie Bravo, Ty’Quan Buchanan, Gessel Are- valo, Adrian Hislop, Keila Balen, Nathaniel Melvin, Elijah Rosa, Dominique Brisbane, Lianis Rodriguez, Jennyffer Siavichay, Aquaysia Sheppard, Mariah Gutierrez, Alicia Anderson, Faith Skerrett, Isaiah Montero, and Javon Gaines

Project Designer and Facilitator: Traci Molloy

Co-Facilitators: Marilyn Byrd, Danny Colon, Stewart Wagner, Paula Dallac- qua, Daniel Nohejl, and Ryan O’Connell
Additional Support from: Nathan Larson, Jeff Paladino, and Valerie McKee

 

 

There Are No Second Chances Here is a collaborative portrait project made in partnership with 9th and 10th grade students at Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom High School (FLH) in the Bronx. The artwork was made to honor the lives of the Black and Latinx men and women killed by police officers in America in 2016.  It was also meant to call into question issues of institutional racism, mental health discrimination, police brutality, mass incarceration, violence, profiling, and oppression affecting this country.

Before beginning the portrait paintings, students studied the Haitian Revolution in depth, analyzing complex ideas related to oppression and revolt. They then drew comparisons between the Haitian Revolution to aspects of the U.S. Slave trade, the Civil Rights Movement (with an emphasis on the murder of Emmett Till), and the Black Lives Matter Movement (with an emphasis on the murder of Trayvon Martin). This information served as the backdrop for the portrait project.

The subject matter for this project was found via researching The Guardian’s “The Counted: People Killed by Police in the U.S.” The initial portraits were provided by the Visiting Artist. FLH students independently researched their individual to determine the direction of their project and the descriptive biographical text. They also composed their respective background imagery, color scheme, and typographic designs that accompanied the paintings.

More than 250 portraits were generated for this project. 30% of the people killed last year are represented in this exhibition. All of the deaths occurred during the calendar year of 2016. Some of the deaths made national news. The vast majority of them did not. Many of the people killed had previous police records. Many did not. Some people struggled with serious mental health issues, such as bipolar disorder, PTSD, and depression. The ages of the deceased ranged from 13-64.  

- Traci Molloy

Visiting Artist and Project Facilitator

 

Reflections on this project from the FLH students

 

This was an art piece that showed the true side of the people that were killed by policeman. Not all of them were good, and not all of them were bad, but all of them were part of the minority. Seeing all the faces was really heartbreaking because with every line I traced, I thought about how it could've been me.

 

- Hector Aponte   

The reason for this project was to acknowledge the young Black and Hispanic youth that lost their lives to police brutality. Crime is high in low-income areas because of desperation. People sometimes depend on illegal activities to make a living. There is also institutional racism.

- Faith Skerritt

           

Black people rarely get second chances when they commit a crime. Meanwhile a white man kills multiple people in a movie theater and he gets no jail time. Instead they label him “mentally ill”. A wise brother told me once wherever poverty is, there will be hunger, and wherever hunger is, there will be needs, and when somebody needs, they will do whatever they can to feed their needs, whether it is legal or illegal. From this project, I was able to learn about people who never got a second chance – men who were never given the opportunity to change their lives around.”

- Miguel Del Rosario

 

This project taught me what each person went through, and all the events that led up to their death. When I see all the pieces hanging together, I will feel sad. We need to change the way things are and make a difference.”

- Carilee Torruella

IMG_0016.jpg
       
     
IMG_8205_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_6049.jpg
       
     
IMG_0806.JPG
       
     
IMG_0023.jpg
       
     
 (Left to Right)     Strange Fruit (99¢ Series)  MIlo Matthieu  Mixed Media  2016  26.75 x 25.5”     Jim Crow (99¢ Series)  MIlo Matthieu  Mixed Media  2016  26.75” x 25.5”     The Charmer (99¢ Series)  MIlo Matthieu  Mixed Media  2017  48” x 32”     Untitled Dinner Rendezvous (A HOME AWAY Series)  MIlo Matthieu  Mixed Media  2016  12 x 16”     Untitled Portrait (A HOME AWAY series)  MIlo Matthieu  Mixed Media  2016  10”x10”     Rage and societal oppressions, encouraged by white supremacists heteropatriarchal capitalism destroy our perceptions of ourselves, by imposing standards that were created on the basis of being anti-black. As we internalize these standards as an attempt to assimilate we must take a step back and truly reflect; understanding that self-policing and adhering to oppressive standards will never liberate us. The centrality of the Black/African Diasporan experience is key to the liberation of the United States. All institutions in this country have been perverted and contorted to become tools of oppression. From religion being used as an instrument of enslavement to eurocentric standards as a device of psychological terrorism.  We must truly ask ourselves, Whose interest does self hatred serve? Matthieu’s works speak to the concepts of Good and evil, one would not exist with- out the other. The stark use of black and white amplify the relationship between the oppressor and the oppressed. The oppressors could not exist without the op- pressed but the oppressed can thrive without the oppressors. Once WE, working- class people, gain control over all of the institutions that govern our lives, society will be put on an equal playing eld.
       
     

(Left to Right)

 

Strange Fruit (99¢ Series)

MIlo Matthieu

Mixed Media

2016

26.75 x 25.5”

 

Jim Crow (99¢ Series)

MIlo Matthieu

Mixed Media

2016

26.75” x 25.5”

 

The Charmer (99¢ Series)

MIlo Matthieu

Mixed Media

2017

48” x 32”

 

Untitled Dinner Rendezvous (A HOME AWAY Series)

MIlo Matthieu

Mixed Media

2016

12 x 16”

 

Untitled Portrait (A HOME AWAY series)

MIlo Matthieu

Mixed Media

2016

10”x10”

 

Rage and societal oppressions, encouraged by white supremacists heteropatriarchal capitalism destroy our perceptions of ourselves, by imposing standards that were created on the basis of being anti-black. As we internalize these standards as an attempt to assimilate we must take a step back and truly reflect; understanding that self-policing and adhering to oppressive standards will never liberate us. The centrality of the Black/African Diasporan experience is key to the liberation of the United States. All institutions in this country have been perverted and contorted to become tools of oppression. From religion being used as an instrument of enslavement to eurocentric standards as a device of psychological terrorism.

We must truly ask ourselves, Whose interest does self hatred serve?
Matthieu’s works speak to the concepts of Good and evil, one would not exist with- out the other. The stark use of black and white amplify the relationship between the oppressor and the oppressed. The oppressors could not exist without the op- pressed but the oppressed can thrive without the oppressors. Once WE, working- class people, gain control over all of the institutions that govern our lives, society will be put on an equal playing eld.

IMG_0058.jpg
       
     
 (Left to Right)  Untitled (Chanya)  Adrienne Rose  Newsprint  2016  16x20”     Space & Time  Shellyne Rodriguez  Collage  2016  10 x 12”     Untitled (Max)  Adrienne Rose  Newsprint  2016  16x20”     When the Firmaments Come Crashing Down...What?  Shellyne Rodriguez  Mix Media  Collage  2016  12 x 22”   
       
     

(Left to Right)

Untitled (Chanya)

Adrienne Rose

Newsprint

2016

16x20”

 

Space & Time

Shellyne Rodriguez

Collage

2016

10 x 12”

 

Untitled (Max)

Adrienne Rose

Newsprint

2016

16x20”

 

When the Firmaments Come Crashing Down...What?

Shellyne Rodriguez

Mix Media

Collage

2016

12 x 22”

 

IMG_6106.jpg
       
     
 Stargazer  Cheyenne Julien  Acrylic on Canvas  2016  30”x36”     (From Right to Left)  F.U.B.U. Cheyenne Julien  Oil on Canvas  2013  18”x24”     Untitled (Girl with Flower)  Cheyenne Julien  Acrylic on canvas  2016  12”x16”     Self Portrait  Cheyenne Julien  Acrylic on canvas  2015  12”x14”     Identity Crisis  Cheyenne Julien  acrylic on canvas  2015  10”x12”     By imagining our own realities, we can create alternatives for the institutions that devalue us. Julien uses bright colors and abstraction as a humanizing tool, challenges the viewer to define self and societal influences by their own terms while acknowledging the contractions of existing in a system that is meant to destroy you.  The action of black abstraction is a device that must be used and has been used throughout history for imagining alternatives. During these times of continued but increased oppressions, the black imagination is pivotal to our survival.
       
     

Stargazer

Cheyenne Julien

Acrylic on Canvas

2016

30”x36”

 

(From Right to Left)

F.U.B.U.
Cheyenne Julien

Oil on Canvas

2013

18”x24”

 

Untitled (Girl with Flower)

Cheyenne Julien

Acrylic on canvas

2016

12”x16”

 

Self Portrait

Cheyenne Julien

Acrylic on canvas

2015

12”x14”

 

Identity Crisis

Cheyenne Julien

acrylic on canvas

2015

10”x12”

 

By imagining our own realities, we can create alternatives for the institutions that devalue us. Julien uses bright colors and abstraction as a humanizing tool, challenges the viewer to define self and societal influences by their own terms while acknowledging the contractions of existing in a system that is meant to destroy you.

The action of black abstraction is a device that must be used and has been used throughout history for imagining alternatives. During these times of continued but increased oppressions, the black imagination is pivotal to our survival.

IMG_0810.JPG
       
     
IMG_8014_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
IMG_0820.JPG
       
     
 (Back Wall, Left to Right)     Origin of the World  Jonathan Gardenhire  Digital C-Print  2013  24x36”     Untitled, (Black Confession/American Hunger 1943-2017)  Jonathan Gardenhire  Archival Pigment Print  2017  30x20”     Untitled, 1 of 3 (2014)  Adrienne Rose  Newsprint  2014     Untitled, 2 of 3 (2014)  Adrienne Rose  Newsprint  2014     Untitled, 3 of 3 (2014)  Adrienne Rose  Newsprint  2014     Untitled  Anthony J. Thomas  Mixed-Media  2017  Various     In conversation, Gardenhire and Rose’s works tell a story of personal liberation through process. Rose’s triptych self-portrait is the epitome of resistance. By boldly reclaiming her selfhood she seemingly shakes off the demons of yesterday, removing the illusions. By quoting novelist and icon, Richard Wright, Gardenhire proclaims a narrative all too familiar to working-class people; the Amerikkka that we know to be true, very different from the ”America” mainstream society claims it to be. Finally, Garden- hire’s Origin of the World expresses the action of education/personal study as a tool of defense against the false narratives imposed on working-class communities (often kept intentionally unattainable). From Left to Right, the works tell a similar story of process; by disillusioning self with education as the catalyst.
       
     

(Back Wall, Left to Right)

 

Origin of the World

Jonathan Gardenhire

Digital C-Print

2013

24x36”

 

Untitled, (Black Confession/American Hunger 1943-2017)

Jonathan Gardenhire

Archival Pigment Print

2017

30x20”

 

Untitled, 1 of 3 (2014)

Adrienne Rose

Newsprint

2014

 

Untitled, 2 of 3 (2014)

Adrienne Rose

Newsprint

2014

 

Untitled, 3 of 3 (2014)

Adrienne Rose

Newsprint

2014

 

Untitled

Anthony J. Thomas

Mixed-Media

2017

Various

 

In conversation, Gardenhire and Rose’s works tell a story of personal liberation through process. Rose’s triptych self-portrait is the epitome of resistance. By boldly reclaiming her selfhood she seemingly shakes off the demons of yesterday, removing the illusions. By quoting novelist and icon, Richard Wright, Gardenhire proclaims a narrative all too familiar to working-class people; the Amerikkka that we know to be true, very different from the ”America” mainstream society claims it to be. Finally, Garden- hire’s Origin of the World expresses the action of education/personal study as a tool of defense against the false narratives imposed on working-class communities (often kept intentionally unattainable). From Left to Right, the works tell a similar story of process; by disillusioning self with education as the catalyst.

IMG_6074.jpg
       
     
IMG_8297_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
Sarah E. Wright & Joe Kaye Political Education Center
       
     
Sarah E. Wright & Joe Kaye Political Education Center

The Sarah E. Wright & Joe Kaye Political Education Center is a mobile library honor- ing 60+ years of tremendous political work and writings of Sarah E. Wright and Joe Kaye, their dedication to the liberation of work- ing class people around the world was a core inspiration for this exhibition. Guests are encouraged to connect, reflect, and start meaningful dialogue in the mobile library.

IMG_0005.jpg
       
     
 (Brick Wall, From Left to Right)     Untitled, (Shomari), 2013-2017  Jonathan Gardenhire  Archival PIgment Print  2013-2017  50x40”     Terrible and Beautiful  Shani Peters  Laser cut wood words - diptych  2016  Both 12x16”     Eternal, Every Time  Shani Peters  Laser cut wood words - diptych  2016  Both 12x16”     Rise Set  Shani Peters  Laser cut wood words - diptych  2016  Both 12x16”     Within the context of a dehumanizing society, the act of intimacy and self acknowledgment is a way to resist state-inflicted destruction. The institutions that oppress working-class communities bene t from our internal devaluation. As we create new & empower existing narratives for ourselves and our communities, we must re- member to question the concepts of blackness, latinidad, sexuality, gender, visibility, citizenship,etc. that have been imposed on us from people that do not have our interests in mind.  In the age of perceived wokeness and more blatant oppression; working-class communities can not afford to ignore the cause of our troubling conditions. As people (especially womyn of color) who have been consistently on the front lines of every struggle for liberation we must acknowledge our rightful place as leaders and revolutionaries in a capitalist system that exists to exploit us for everything we have. By appropriating terms from revolutionary thinkers like James Baldwin, on wood, Peters speaks to the ways in which people, like wood are subject to their conditions and must welcome the contradictions of our experience with open arms to confront the core of our issues.
       
     

(Brick Wall, From Left to Right)

 

Untitled, (Shomari), 2013-2017

Jonathan Gardenhire

Archival PIgment Print

2013-2017

50x40”

 

Terrible and Beautiful

Shani Peters

Laser cut wood words - diptych

2016

Both 12x16”

 

Eternal, Every Time

Shani Peters

Laser cut wood words - diptych

2016

Both 12x16”

 

Rise Set

Shani Peters

Laser cut wood words - diptych

2016

Both 12x16”

 

Within the context of a dehumanizing society, the act of intimacy and self acknowledgment is a way to resist state-inflicted destruction. The institutions that oppress working-class communities bene t from our internal devaluation. As we create new & empower existing narratives for ourselves and our communities, we must re- member to question the concepts of blackness, latinidad, sexuality, gender, visibility, citizenship,etc. that have been imposed on us from people that do not have our interests in mind.

In the age of perceived wokeness and more blatant oppression; working-class communities can not afford to ignore the cause of our troubling conditions. As people (especially womyn of color) who have been consistently on the front lines of every struggle for liberation we must acknowledge our rightful place as leaders and revolutionaries in a capitalist system that exists to exploit us for everything we have. By appropriating terms from revolutionary thinkers like James Baldwin, on wood, Peters speaks to the ways in which people, like wood are subject to their conditions and must welcome the contradictions of our experience with open arms to confront the core of our issues.

IMG_8204_February 09, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg
       
     
 Pheonix (Calling on the Spirit of the Garbage Offensive)  Shellyne Rodriguez  Assemblage  2015  4.5 x 2 x 3’.     The broom is reminiscent of a past of movements and social uproar that pushed young and old from the east harlem hoods to rede ne themselves. “Cleaning the Garbage” had become a campaign that would lead to garbage piled in the middle of the roads and set on re. Popular support for The Young Lords organization and the self-determination of the Puerto Rican community in the U.S was born out of the ashes. The teeth signify striking back and confronting the systemic issues plagu- ing our people, and our communities. Rage becomes a tool for empowerment and honoring our experiences.
       
     

Pheonix (Calling on the Spirit of the Garbage Offensive)

Shellyne Rodriguez

Assemblage

2015

4.5 x 2 x 3’.

 

The broom is reminiscent of a past of movements and social uproar that pushed young and old from the east harlem hoods to rede ne themselves. “Cleaning the Garbage” had become a campaign that would lead to garbage piled in the middle of the roads and set on re. Popular support for The Young Lords organization and the self-determination of the Puerto Rican community in the U.S was born out of the ashes. The teeth signify striking back and confronting the systemic issues plagu- ing our people, and our communities. Rage becomes a tool for empowerment and honoring our experiences.

IMG_0816.JPG
       
     
IMG_0068.jpg
       
     
IMG_0019.jpg
       
     
IMG_0018.jpg